Contrapuntal: Transforming Gaza

A Blog by Marilyn Garson

Who are we aiding in Gaza?

The blockade itself is the first anomaly of Gaza, and the immediate cause of Gazans’ suffering. That our Western governments tolerate the blockade wall is the second anomaly. The composition of our aid to the people behind that wall is the third: we bankroll the maintenance of the blockade regime. It is not true that nothing works in Gaza. The problem is that so little is tried.

Follow Contrapuntal

What’s new?

Reading Maimonides In Gaza Mondoweiss has published an expanded version of my earlier story of my time in Gaza.  Part of each purchase price goes to the We Are Not Numbers project, supporting Gazan writers.  You can read more, and order copies here.  I’m very proud that Mondoweiss has made Reading Maimonedes in Gaza the second in their forthcoming series of hardcopy publications!

What is Contrapuntal?

I lived and worked in Gaza, 2011 – 2015.  I want to add adjectives to our understanding of the community of Gaza:  young, ambitious, educated, loving, resisting and audaciously human.

The name ‘Contrapuntal’ refers to the harmony of hope that I used to hear, in the voices of my Israeli relatives and my Gazan colleagues.

We need to de-exceptionalize Israel-Palestine, and bring this conflict into the realm of law and (equal) human rights.  That’s where justice will be found.

I frame the conversation in the language of human rights, legal accountabilities, and international solutions.  Those frameworks equalize us.
Gaza needs freedom and justice.  The blockade which devalues and endangers two million lives must end.

There has to be a visionary alternative, a distinction between the this-worldness which doesn’t allow us to see beyond the impossible odds in power and status, and the possibility of dreaming a different dream, and seeing an alternative to all this.

To every situation, there is always an alternative.

One must train onesself to think the alternative, not to think the accepted and the status quo or to believe that the present is frozen.

Edward Said, The Pen And The Sword, 1993